Around and About the Avenues – January 2015

In January at the Ney: The museum is reprising its Drawing Salon Series, every Saturday this month, from 10:00 a.m. to noon. Participants draw from an extensive collection of sculptures, examining the human form in splendid poses, garbs, and action in plaster and Carrera marble. Staff will be there to provide instructive lessons and art materials. Remember—you don’t have to be good! Dates are January 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31. At 304 E. 44th.  For more information, call 512-458-2255.

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More of the Same: The latest update from the city on the Airport Boulevard Form-Based Code Initiative is similar to the one sent last spring regarding Opticos Design as the lead consultant for the review of the City of Austin Land Development Code (LDC). According to Jorge Rousselin, Process Coordinator for the City of Austin Planning and Development Review Department, Opticos Design consultants will now assist staff to finalize integration of the project with CodeNEXT, the Imagine Austin program begun in 2013 to revise the city’s LDC. After the creation (integration?) of form-base standards specific to the Airport Boulevard corridor between Lamar and IH-35, a series of public meetings and neighborhood roundtables will be held to present the code and to gather community input. –Doris Coward

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Contact Team Meeting: The regular quarterly meeting will take place 7:00 – 8:30 p.m., Monday January 26 at Trinity United Methodist Church. Agenda items include (1) a discussion of CodeNEXT and its implications for Hyde Park’s Neighborhood Plan and NCCDs and (2) a vote on whether to replace the chair of the Contact Team. A possible additional item is a guest speaker from the city to talk about sidewalks.

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Dubious Distinction for Austin: According to a recent study by Trulia, Austin ranked 9th among most unaffordable U.S. cities. The less affordable cities are mostly in California, except for the New York City metropolitan area. By Trulia’s definition, a city is affordable if “the total monthly payment, including mortgage, insurance, and property taxes, is less than 31% of the metro area’s median household income.” Thus, what’s affordable varies from city to city. The link to the study is as follows: http://www.trulia.com/trends/2014/11/middle-class-millennials-report/.