Local Historic District

The Hyde Park Local Historic District went into effect on December 26, 2010, ten days after passage by the Austin City Council.

In practical terms, what does that mean to property owners in the boundaries of the Local Historic District?

  • There are two types of structures in a local historic district: contributing and non-contributing. A contributing structure is a house or building that is at least 50 years old, that was built during the period of significance for the historic district, and that contributes architecturally, historically, or both to the historic character of the district. Approximately 75% of the structures in Hyde Park are contributing.
  • If your house (or other structure) is a contributing structure, you are required to submit any proposed changes of the exterior to the Historic Preservation Office for approval. In many cases, the Historic Preservation Officer can approve your changes; in cases of significant changes, the Historic Preservation Officer will refer your case to the Historic Landmark Commission for review. The Design Standards in the Hyde Park Preservation Plan describes what changes are and are not acceptable.
  • Contributing structures cannot be demolished except in extreme circumstances. Requests for demolition permits must be approved by the Historic Landmark Commission.
  • If you own an empty lot in Hyde Park, any structure you build must adhere to the Design Standards in the Hyde Park Preservation Plan. Plans must be submitted to the Historic Preservation Office and the Historic Landmark Commission for review and approval.
  • If your house (or other structure) is non-contributing, you do not have any restrictions. Approximately 25% of the structures in Hyde Park are non-contributing.

Hyde Park Local Historic District Map

The dark squares represent contributing structures. Click for larger image.

Hyde Park Local Historic District Resources